Z and Cinder’s Blog Challenge #9

Z and Cinder’s Blog Challenge #9

How do you explain your gaming hobby to non-gaming friends/family?

I don’t. 

I only got into WoW because of Mr B and I’m not sure my family even know I game. In fairness, it’s not often these days with the kids, but I just don’t talk about it. I wouldn’t lie, but I don’t offer the information. Part of the reason I keep this blog fairly anonymous. Sad really 😦

My close family is super traditional (leave baby to cry / bedtime at 6pm / no computer or TV during the day etc) so they certainly would not approve and the stigma that still exists with gaming is still very much – and wrongly so – alive. In the day of those annoying facebook games that everyone spends their time on too… candy crush anyone?!

I hate that I can’t be open about gaming (and many other things if I’m honest, but that’s a whole other story!), but it saves a lot of hassle not explaining it.

I have some more liberal relatives on the outer rings of the family circle who know I join in with Mr B’s hobby. They’re very accepting and when they ask, we explain it’s an online game with lots of others and you team up to kill stuff. They’re usually pretty happy with that.

I’ve tried in the past. My brother and I both gamed from our late teens, but my parents really didn’t understand. They’re very much of the “just pause it!” generation.

When I was raid leading 8 years ago and my mum was telling me to stop playing RIGHT NOW… me trying to explain that 39 other people were relying on me to be there… not fun. They resorted in the end to switching the wifi off.

I just connected to next door 😉

This post actually got us talking about our kids and their future gaming habits. I think we definitely would not want there to be a stigma around gaming with us and communication and balance is the key. If they want to raid, fine if it was age appropriate and I trusted them online. I also want there to be open access if they’re online – no sneaking around like we both did. I also wouldnt want it to affect family life and missing dinner would have to be pre arranged.

However, I was a rent paying adult when my parents used to dictate to me, and if my kids were paying rent then what they do in their own time is up to them. I would only expect them for dinner as if they were living alone – whenever they wanted.

I would totally draw the line at excessive drink or any drugs in my house though – rent paying or not!!!

I hate that if we were into football or travelling or, I don’t know, pottery throwing that because it’s socially accepted there would be no snide comments about “anti socialism” or “wasting your life”. Especially in today’s society where we welcome so many cultural differences. 

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